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Lewy Body Disease: Everything You Need to Know

When protein clumps known as Lewy bodies accumulate in the brain, the result is a kind of dementia known as Lewy body dementia (LBD). They disrupt the functioning of the brain areas responsible for learning, memory, emotion, and sleep. Since LBD is a progressive disorder, its symptoms get worsen over time. There is now no treatment that can reverse the disease, but you can manage it. What is Lewy Body Dementia? If Lewy bodies are found in your brain, you may suffer from Lewy body dementia (LBD). Some neurons develop protein clumps called Lewy bodies (brain cells). They damage your...

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Lewy Body Dementia

Besides Alzheimer's, Lewy body dementia (sometimes spelled "dementia with Lewy bodies") is the most common form of progressive dementia. Lewy bodies are protein deposits that form in the nerve cells of the parts of the brain responsible for thought, memory, and movement (motor control). The symptoms of Lewy body dementia include a gradual decrease in mental capacity. Lewy body dementia patients may have changed states of consciousness and visual hallucinations. Other side effects include typical symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as muscle stiffness, slow movement, trouble walking, and tremors. Symptoms Symptoms of Lewy body dementia may include: Visual hallucinations: one...

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Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening

For those suffering from Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), blood flow to the legs becomes difficult because large and medium-sized arteries become narrowed or clogged with plaque. Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, is atherosclerosis (sometimes called hardening of the arteries) that affects the arteries in the limbs. When atherosclerosis is present in the peripheral arteries, it may spread to other body parts. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), which cuts off blood flow to the legs and feet (gangrene), can cause pain in the feet and legs and eventually cause tissue death. Both smoking and diabetes slow blood flow, making people more likely...

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Management of Peripheral Artery Disease

Atherosclerotic disease of the lower extremities, peripheral artery disease is a leading cause of death from cardiovascular causes. Adjustments to one's way of life, medication, endovascular repair, or surgery may all be part of the treatment plan for this ailment. Reducing cholesterol, antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, peripheral vasodilators, blood pressure management, exercise therapy, and quitting smoking are some therapeutic approaches to peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis has systemic consequences, such as stroke and myocardial infarction, but limb-related effects, such as critical limb ischemia and amputation, can be mitigated by following this regimen. Peripheral artery disease is less well-addressed than coronary artery disease....

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